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and at the top it said lincoln. the guy who played stanton said he was so nervous about meeting dain yell day and told you have to call him mr. lincoln. stanton had hurt lincoln in reality in the 1850s. i apologize, mr. lincoln for having hurt you in the 1850s and daniel day, says, it's all right, i've for given you. >> when they heard him coming down the hall, here comes the president. >> i think of you as a movie star and you have a movie star brought a clip from the film. get this clip up in terms of what we're seeing and brief look inside the movie. >> the main things that happens, lincoln makes a decision that he needs the 13th amendment because once the war ends, the emancipation pro clamation will no longer have legal validity. he was only able to issue it because it was a war measure. if the war ends with permanent dealing with slavery, that slavery could come back. he's taking a huge risk by going to a congress that had already turned it down but he realizes a lot of democrats there lost their seats and he can use his power and give them jobs and what he wants. he trades -- jobs were
. >> have you thought about another book? >> i have. i am starting work on a colleague, edwin stanton. it will take a few years. there is a lot to work through. i think there is an interesting story. >> he was with the president when he was dying. >> there were a lot of things. i am thinking about starting the book. on the same night, in the bedroom, as edwin stanton, with one eye on the dying president, starts the manhunt for both and the other killers. >> our guest has been walter stahr. he has a book about john jay and his new book, "seward: lincoln's indispensable man." thank you for coming. >> for a dvd copy of this program call 1-877-662-7726. for free transcripts or to give us your comments about this program, visit us at www.q-and- "q&a" programs are also available as c-span podcasts. >> tomorrow, we will talk about mitt romney's governing style from 2003 to 2007. brian mooney has covered politics for decades. lindafeldmann is our the justice appointment of points federal observers. "washington journal" at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the same co
here and i lot of the first floor. >> reporter: surreal scenes in new york stanton island a boat washed onto a street. in manhattan flooded underpasses looking like still this house caught on fire as floodwaters dropped and power came on sparking a gas leak. owners returned to damaged homes and businesses. >> makes you want to cry because it's just something you never expected to see and you work so hard for. >> reporter: homeowners in new york's breezy point neighborhood returned to what's left of their homes. 11 home burned to the ground after winds snapped power lines. some said they were lucky, insurance covers fire damage but almost nobody had flood insurance. reporting live. john fowler. ktvu. >> the storm that sent wave across the east coast is being felt by relief agency offices in the bay area. fema's area 9 is head quartered here in oakland. so far a ten person team was sent to help with sandy relief efforts. emergency supplies from the moffet field depot could also be shipped east. 30 red cross volunteers the bay area have deployed to help and up to 100 more could leave in
:30 eastern. beatrix hoffman's take on the health care system over the last eighty years. and thomas stanton explores why some firms fail. this week david k. johnston diss his book "the fine print" how they use plain i english to rob you blind. visit for more information in an interview taped outside of washington, d.c., wayne karlin talking about his book wandering souls which is an account of the u.s. soldier return to vietnam to return a notbook he took from a soldier he killed during the north vietnam war. >>> joining us now on booktv is author and professor wayne karlin who most recent book is "wandering soul." professor karlin who was homer? >> he is a friend of mine who retired living in north carolina. he was a officer platoon leader in the vietnam war. and he had contacted me a number of years ago because i had some contacts in vietnam vietnamese i had been working with, he had taken a documents and a book from the body of an vietnamese soldier he killed during the war. and wanted to see if he could find a family and return those documents to this them. >> why. he had gon
all the girls. john stanton said there are actually people who woke up . >>> right now on "first look," no dies fce for rice. she meets with her republican critics but fails to sway them. >>> power ball fever spreads across the country as the jackpot climbs to a record 500 million big ones. and 'tis the season. find out which companies ended up on the naughty and nice list. today president obama will be holding a series of meetings with leaders of large corporations to talk about averting the tax hikes and budget cuts from the so-called fiscal cliff. the president met with small business owners on tuesday to talk about the effect on their companies from taxes and other charges. right now congress is stalled over finding a solution as democrats demand higher taxes for high wage earners while republicans want cuts to entitlement programs. and last night on hardball, former republican senator alan simpson gave his thoughts on the fiscal cliff and failure of lawmakers to reach an agreement. p. >> they love their party more than they love their country. how it we get to that point, do
at market. imprisoned by the shop owner. this person was brought from quebec stanton years ago at age 16. she worked long days a little food and was never paid and lived in constant fear of violence. uxbekistan. >> even hit me when i was pregnant and beat me for two hours straight. bruises on my legs and on my face. >> this person had two children while being held as a slave and is pregnant again. she said the father was one of her captors who regularly beat her,. her 5-year-old daughter is missing. she doesn't know if she is dead or alive. >> the 11 slaves were freed during this raid, not by the police but by campaigners who had been alerted by the mother of one of the women. >> over 10 years this mini market was there prison. they lived and slept downstairs in the basement and were not allowed beyond the front door. it seems the local police knew about this but were being paid off and brought back anybody who escaped. when three of the freed slaves went to report their imprisonment, they found themselves being detained again by the police as illegal immigrants. the activists had to fre
romney campaigned in northern virginia. they made stops in fairfax, sterling, and stanton holding rallies for supporters and volunte volunteers. romney will be at lynchburg tomorrow and george mason later that day. president obama was in new hampshire, florida today, ohio and colorado tonight, but his surrogates spent the day in the commonwealth. madeline albright canvassed with campaign volunteers. >>> that close to home today, police are searching for a person of interest after a robbery at a obama campaign office down in florida. fort meyers place say an employee found the front door of the office smashed this morning. the only thing reported missing is an envelope with an undisclosed amount of money inside of it. no computers stolen, no vandalism was reported. surveillance cameras captured a man on video in that area overnight. >>> be sure to stay with news 4 for complete coverage of the election. you can also stay up to date on our website, >>> well, another disappointing day for redskins fans at fedex field. coach mike shanahan called this game a must win earlier
will have to start thinking about governing in the same way. joining us is john stanton. thank you for being here. >> it's good to be here. >> what do you think seems newly possible now? election reform? filibuster reform in the senate? anything on immigration? does any of that seem viable to you? >> i hate to be a wet blanket, but immigration reform, yes. there's certainly a possibility that immigration reform in some manner could be done. the problem there, though, frankly is that john boehner has come out and said, look, i want to do this. we learned a lesson from the election. a lot of republicans feel they need to do something. the problem is when you start to dig into what they are saying f you look at what john boehner said earlier this week, he said first a step by step approach. we want to do border and then visas and then do some other things. that's very much what republicans have been saying for the last several years. they don't want to do a comprehensive deal. they want to do rifle shot legislation. and advocates of immigration reform are very opposed to that. they understand i
trust. john alter, boris epshteyn, john stanton. are we any less or red and blue america since we first met barack obama in 2004? >> i would say yes. i think particularly on social issues, if you look at what happened with guy marriage, this last week, some of the drug legalization things, obviously the country on social issues is starting to move towards the left, i think. but if you look at the house of representatives, it's still controlled by republicans. and while some of that can be written off as part of the -- >> gerrymandering. >> right. still a lot of that shows that on fiscal issues, we are still a pretty conservative country. and i think we're starting to see sort of the real purple i guess color of the country show through a little bit now. >> are we, boys? barring a few states, it does seem to me that most of the states are pretty well decided before we get to the first tuesday in november. >> which i think is very unfortunate. especially in an election we just saw where the economy is the number one issue over archingly. i believe we as republicans would have done better
carlos stanton voiced his frustration yesterday tweeting "all right, i'm pissed off, plain and simple." we'll get mike barnicle's opinion just ahead on "morning joe." sounds like a team he could gm. >> exactly right. >> now to the nba, the knicks, last undefeated team in basketball putting their perfect record on the line against the orlando magic. first quarter, knicks on the break, carmelo anthony gets ahead of the defense and throws down the one-handed jam and led with 25 points, 8 rebounds on the night. jump ahead to the fourth quarter, raymond felton, tyson chandler team up for the alley-oop. watch it. they beat the magic, 99-89 and improve to 5-0 on the year. jeremy lin who? this is just the third 5-0 start yore your new york knickerbockers. >>> the scandal that ended the career of david petraeus, now threatens the reputation of america's top general in afghanistan. we're going to speak about the implications for the u.s. military with barnacle and the rest of the "morning joe" crew. >>> when we come back we'll huddle around the water cooler where stephen colbert has choice word
for quite sometime. minutes ago there was a downpour and it tapered off. we are along stanton avenue and you can see traffic [ inaudible ]. we are been driving all over. why don't you take a look at this. we've been finding pockets of rain coming down pretty hard. [ inaudible ] >> this weather is real slow. >> it can't be real bad. you can come over here and watch the rain and hang out the fellas and get your hair cut. it is all good. >> these are pictures that we took earlier in the day in a soggy san rafael as you can see here. we'll have much more on this rainy weather when we check in with our meteorologist mark. >>> despite the rainy weather, holiday travel and people flying in and out of airports are experiencing minor delays. oakland and san jose have gate holds or arrival delays of 15 minutes or less and san francisco is also running smoothly tonight but about 10% of flights have had long delays and that is over 45 minutes. >>> this storm is racing across the bay area, packing a narrow cold front to produce the moderate to heavy rain as we just saw in jade's live shot. you can see at
with about $500 billion in cuts over the next ten years. in phoenix, mayor greg stanton calls sequestration the number one threat to his city's economy and disastrous for arizona jobs. >> in arizona, we would lose almost 50,000 jobs immediately. and we know that they're the right kind of jobs. 35,000 of those jobs would be in the defense and aerospace industries and in arizona, those are some of our highest paying jobs. >> reporter: that's the case in regions across the country where the defense industry is strong. one of those is johnstown, pennsylvania. the manufacturers that used to make steel here found new life making things for the u.s. military. but here at j.w.f. industries, defense orders are already starting to decline. they estimate the sequester could lead to a 60% profit cut and layoffs of more than 100 workers. >> we're in small town america. and it's not like we're in the beltway where if you lose this job, you can go to another job. there's another opportunity, you don't have that here. so anyone in the defense industry that's in small town america, is going to have a huge
difficulties ] >> bill: kongman, jesse jackson, jr. has retired. john stanton will be with us. great lineup today, but first. >> some of the headlines making news on this monday. president obama and his daughter went out on saturday to a block store in arlington, virginia. he consulted his blackberry and bought 15 books for his friends and family. unlike michelle who is said to spent hours on shopping. >> he is a professional guy. mission accomplished. >> notre dame is heading to the bcs national championship game. they went undefeated for the season and now awaiting the winner for the sec championship. they'll likely face either alabama or georgia in that game. >> they will play either alabama or georgia. role tide. >> instan gram broke a already for the number of pictures up loaded on thanksgiving day. a total of 10 million uploads on the social sharing program. >> bill: there are people who will never take a bite before they take a picture. whatever course it is. >> peter is shaking his head. >> shut up and eat your food. >> i'll admit i put up some instagram photos of food
video 1 ---no se escaparon de algun circo de visita en la ciudad en stanton island, nueva york, este caballo miniatura y zebra se escaparon de una granja y se les vio corriendo por el estacionamiento de un centro comercial. --zachary osher, quien es dueÑo de uno de los negocios por donde pasaban, tomo su camara de video y grabo la inusual visita. --los animales, fueron atrpados devueltos a su granja. video 2 --en shangai, china....le soprendera ver lo que este abilidoso conductor puede hacer con una excavadora de construccion que pesa 24 toneladas, bailar gangam style! --los visitantes de la feria donde se presento el numero,. no tuvieron de otra mas que aplaudir mientras observaban. video 3 --esta maÑana, los estudiantes de una escuela primaria en carolina del sur, formaron entre todos un enorme faro y todo como parte de un homenaje a la semana cultural de la escuela que se celebra anualmente... ---mas de mil niÑos ayudaron con el atractivo proyecto. --una grua de 150 pies de altura se utilizo para tomar la foto desde arriba, una vez los alumnos tomaron su lugar. cesar ---recuerd
>> now on booktv thomas stanton argues the main difference between companies that successfully made it through the 2008 financial crisis and those that didn't was the willingness of upper management to listen to feedback before making decisions. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> good afternoon welcome to the cato institute. i am the director of financial regulations here at cato and i'm also honored to serve as the moderator for today's book form. when reading press coverage of the financial crisis one possibly constant we comes across phrases such as the bank said this in the bank said that. there is no one response to the financial crisis or to the events that preceded it. different firms took different approaches. while several ceos and their boards made poor decisions that eventually led to their failure, others made good decisions, prudent decisions and sometimes brilliant decisions that not only save their firms but also about these firms to game gain a share and come out of the crisis stronger than ever. while in my own writings i have tended to place considerable emph
that spontaneity, you have to have a certain construct of structure. >> i'm joe stanton, heritage foundation. how would you evaluate fdr's overall legacy? >> um, disaster. i think that he set america's economy back eight, ten years. there's very good evidence now, and i call your attention to a study which is not widely cited. the study is one of the wage and hours act. and he shows that this act alone probably insured that we would never get pack to 1929 -- get back to 929 employment under roosevelt. basically he compares the hours work to business confidence and business expectations. and what he shows is that, um, the number of hours worked stayed -- went down, while the numbers -- i'm sorry, the number of workers stayed constant while the number of hours worked went down. they were going from ten full-time employees to five part-time employees, somewhere along those lines, and he finds 85-90% of the decline after 1934 when the first wage and hours act can be traced directly to this idea of a might minimum wa. in terms of all the other regulations, the excessive taxation, it's just one disaste
, edward stanton who became secretary defense with various generals it's difficult to see how the north prosecutes the war because this wasn't a unified society, it had to be managed constantly in this endeavor. >> host: let's look at the third president who is also an extreme this is what were wilson. does it turn out as happily as abraham lincoln? >> guest: not even close. >> host: why is he extreme? >> guest: willson is the least experienced in terms of time and politics, the least experienced person ever elected president of the united states. at the time he becomes president his total political experience is about one and a half times since he's spent a day in the legislature in the lower office, governor of badgers he becomes president he's an academic like me a political scientist. i suppose that should make me more favorably disposed to it, but academic research on politics isn't the same as doing politics. it's not the same thing because of what you learned the value experience too much it's about moving you at the learning curve but the other thing it's not just what it gives
protesters for indecent exposure john stanton said there are actually people who woke up today and said today, i'm going to get buck naked in front of john boehner's staff and so it is. getting naked is a tactic. a protest tactic and judging by the wide eyed tweets as it happened, today, nudity worked. see you again tomorrow night. now, it's time for "the last word" with lawrence o'donnell. >>> when kelly corey won the oscar for her first screen play 20 years ago, she had no idea that the heroes of her film, thelma and louise were going to become political role models. >> white house is continue to warn of dire consequences for the middle class. >> on friday, he'll return to the stumps. >> he's back on the campaign trail. >> the campaign style tour. >> trying to drum up public support for his budget priorities. >> seems like just another fight in washington. >> there are really two issues there. >> a revenue side, yes. >> where is that revenue going to come from? >> increasing tax rates is going to harm economic growth. >> warren buffett was out this morning talking about tacking the wealthy.
in culpepper and 60 in fredericksburg and 60 in stanton and 62 in petersburg. there's that line of milder air that we'll start moving through our area tomorrow. i do think we should get up to about 65 degrees for a high temperature tomorrow. look at that bristol down in tennessee, 60 degrees. 52 cleveland, 52 in college park and even those areas in pennsylvania and new york will get a chance to even warm up tomorrow. we've got 70s, even low 80s down around dallas. we're not going to get here, but i do think on sunday as we continue to see this mild air push eastward with some fairly flei nice sunshine a few neighborhoods topping out above 70 degrees on sunday. all right, for your good night wake-up forecast. chilly conditions for sure for the evening and then even tomorrow morning 41, 42 and that's still pretty nippy, as well. other locations starting out in the mid and upper 30s. we have a chilly, dry evening. notice the clouds coming into the area tomorrow. that is a warm front that is going to make it way up there to new york. we're going to see a few clouds with it tomorrow, not a big dea
. stephanie stanton is live in hollywood with a preview of what we can expect with tonight's big show. it's a powerhouse performance tonight. >> reporter: hey, guys. the excitement definitely starting to build here at universal studios backstage. rehearsals are going on right now as we speak. they've been going on all afternoon as these 12 finalists gear up for tonight's big show. here's what we can expect to see. three singers from each team will hit the stage. here's where it gets interesting. the rules have changed a little bit. after tonight, america will vote and the bottom two vote getters overall will be sent home. we could see even numbers after the votes come in, in terms of the teams. among the talent this season, a soulful gospel singer, yale dropout and front-runner includes amanda brown. she rocked the house last week witha aerosmith's dream on. not far behind her is trevon hunt. he was told by his teacher he would never make it in the music business, and boy, is he proving that teacher to be wrong. and team christina, the yale dropout who didn't make it past the blind auditi
, many locations below freezing. stanton, virginia, down to 26 right now. petersburg, west virginia, 29 degrees. elsewhere, if it's in the mid-30s to upper 30s, montgomery, arlington, fairfax, prince george's counties, much of southern maryland as well as in fauquier county where we have the hometown forecast for warrenton. by 6:30 just in the low 30s there. then by the launch hour into the mid-40s with sunshine breaking out. hour by hour today. we'll have winds with us off and on. gusts maybe around 20 miles an hour. forecast for the whole region, highs reaching near 60 with sunshine in the afternoon. right down in the near 40s by sunset today which is early, 5:03. our sunrise that's an hour earlier at 6:40 this morning. a look at the coastal storm, what it may do to us. i'll have the latest on that in ten minutes. the latest on your traffic with danella. good morning. >>> first let's start with i-66 eastbound approaching the beltway. a disabled vehicle there just off to the right shoulder lane. your travel lanes are open. still seeing road work there. if you're traveling westbound 50
, thomas stanton and why some firms thrive why others fail. and at 10:00 p.m. eastern, we conclude the prime time programming with our "after words" program. david cay johnston discusses the fine print. he talked with reporter jayne o'donnell. visit for this weekend's television schedule. >> in her book, "pat nixon", mary brennan discusses the use of mrs. nixon's private documents. this is just over 60 minutes. >> welcome. i'm the acting director of the library and i appreciate all of you coming to our continuing author copies and patience. today, we are very fortunate to have the leading scholar on pat nixon was 100 years ago this year. mary brennan, who did much of her research here for her book is the chair of the department at the university of texas in san marcos. her specialty is post-world war ii conservative movements and she has written to date three different books. conservative women and the crusade against communism and book that we love most is pat nixon, the embattled first lady. her book is an outstanding work and i look forward and would like you to help
that taking a stanton's worth 50% less to die than those who did not. a spokesperson for the american cancer society found these findings in treating but also said that these does not mean that people should with cancer should start taking steffens. >> children's with mother who had the flu during pregnancy could have a higher risk of developing autism. according to a study from denmark. researchers found children were two times more likely to be diagnosed with autism before the age of three. if their mothers had the flu during pregnancy. and children of mothers who had a fever lasting longer than a week word three times greater risk. researchers say, further study needs to be done to better understand the connection we will be right back. [ laughter ] [ girl ] wow, you guys have it easy. i wish i had u-verse when i was your age. in my day, we didn't have these fancy wireless receivers. blah blah blah. if i had a sleepover, i couldn't just move the tv into the playroom. no. we had to watch movies in the den because that's where the tv outlet was. and if dad was snoring on the couch, we muscl
and presenting largely to the work of senator stanton who collected essays were published earlier this year by the university of virginia press. they're entitled those labor to -- [inaudible] slavery the thomas jefferson's. the regard is an authority on the subject. the book was released to coincide with an exhibit on slavery at month cello in the smithsonian museum of african-american history which was cocure rated by the thomas jefferson foundation. many attended opening night. after fifty years of historical research, the thomas jefferson foundation is now in the next phase of interpretation and restoration project fund bid the national endowment to the humanitarian and private support. it's called the landscape and slavery. which includes the creation of many exhibits and key sites and a website and computer animations. of the people held in slavery at month cello. images of only seven men and women survived. all of the name press served. nevertheless, for many years the human dimension was messing from the accounts. in 1993, historians started to an oral history project called "getting
but with stanton who would replace cameron as secretary of defense in various generals, it's difficult. this was not a unified society. this was one i had to be managed constantly and a typical endeavor. >> host: okay, so let's look at your third president who was also as extreme as woodrow wilson. does this turn out exactly is abraham lincoln? >> guest: not even close. wilson again is as unfiltered as you can possibly get. wilson impact is the least experienced in terms of time in politics, the least experienced person ever elected president. at the time he becomes president, his total political experience, all of it, is about 1.5 years so he is not spending a day in the legislature. he gets elected president. >> host: he has written a lot about politics. >> guest: like me has a political scientist. i suppose that should make the more favorably disposed toward him but academic research on politics is not the same thing as doing politics and not the same thing as the experience. in some ways we value experience too much. experiences about moving you up the learning curve. the other thi
, tom stanton, others can't thank you all. i recently looked at the electronic urchin of my book on itunes and itunes informed me that people who bought my book also bought winnie the pooh. [laughter] well, when he first appeared in 1826. fannie mae came on a dozen years later and post it proved excitingly surprisingly durable. one turn into disney franchise. the other became a national disaster. despite all of the troubles, fannie and freddie stiller responsible for most new home mortgages in the night dates. so we have nationalized the huge part of our mortgage industry. how did we get to this point? what was it on purpose. as more of an accident and it was a bipartisan accident. let's go back to the 1930s. about a quarter of the workforce was unemployed. about half of all mortgage debt was in default. housing starts were down about 90%. so when roosevelt became president in 1983, the top priority was to get people back to work. sounds kind of familiar. building houses would be a great way to do that, but to build houses, you need bank loans and banks are not in the mood to campbell
the to the work of stanton who has collected essays which were published earlier this year by the university of virginia press they are entitled, labor to my happiness, slavery and thomas jefferson's monticello. regarded an authority on the subject. her book was released to coincide with an exhibit on slavery in monticello and the smithsonian national museum of african american history, which was co curated by the staff of the thomas jefferson foundation. seventy of the descendants of those commemorated attended the opening nine. after 50 years of archaeological and historical research, thomas jefferson foundation is now in the next phase of interpretation and restoration projects funded by the national endowment for humanities and by private support. the project is called the landscape of slavery, marlborough and monticello, which includes the creation of many exhibits at key sites and ax of smart phones are websites and computer animation. the people held in slavery at monticello, images of only seven men and women survive. but all of the names are preserved. nevertheless, for many years,
channelling all sort of american presidents across the 20th century, eisenhower -- >> of jack stanton, very thinly disguised bill clintonesque figure base opened the novel by anonymous which turned out to be joe klein, directed by jack nicholson. wonderful acting in this movie. this is one of my favorite of john travolta's roles. he takes a big bite out of this character who was so full of appetite and ambition who is so charming and so devious. >> just like nixon. michael, your favorite. who is your favorite movie president. >> maybe because i've just seen it recently but i really love the upcoming spielberg firm "lincoln." you look at henry fonda back in the '30s and raymond massey but here you have both this iconic figure who is treated larger-than-life but day-lewis is a smart and intuitive and detailed actor u-get the man behind -- this is sort of a back stage political machinations drama, no big battle scenes and all that but he's fantastic in it. he is an inspiring president. >> tony get off my plane. air force one. >> the hands one executive. literally. taking t
of seize years. some of -- seizures. some of these victims are like danny stanton. chicago's mike and mary stanton founded the danny foundation after their 4-year-old son, danny, died from a seizure while he was sleeping. it is dedicated to preventing deaths caused by seizures and raising epilepsy awareness among the public and medical community. that's no small task, but one brave 7-year-old is taking a courageous step to help raise awareness of epilepsy's dangers. nick kerley never met danny but nick's cousin suffers from seizures. i felt the need to do something bigger. an enthusiastic hockey player he combined his love for the sport and passion for charity to create 100 miles for danny. the 7-year-old athlete visited 20 different hockey rinks in chicago and skated five miles or 50 laps at each rink. his goal was been to raise money and awareness for epilepsy as well as the danny dibb foundation. i had the pleasure to skate with nick on two different occasions. not only is he a good skater but raising awareness for epilepsy is extraordinary. he has a power example for all of us, one tha
. people forget harrington stanton. >> david, reuters seems to think they know what richard schultz is going to offer for best buy in december. they think it's going to be less than the original bid. starting to look at which private equity players are with him and which are not. your thoughts? >> you know, i checked in on that earlier this week, carl. at least based on a couple of phone calls. and i wouldn't say that i did an enormous amount of reporting. i think we'll have to wait until after thanksgiving, is the sense i got. don't forget, look at that stock. they were talking, what, 25 or above. you know, why would you offer that kind of a premium when the stock has fallen so dramatically since this first began? even with the idea that it would be a lower number, which does make some sense, one would imagine, nonetheless, you're still talking about a $3 billion equity check. now, a lot of that -- at least half, perhaps, going to come from mr. schultz himself as he moves his equity over. raising $1.5 billion from private equity, let's call it, is still a very, very big problem, or
under the tutelage of some officers and a redheaded guy named john stanton. so this philosopher, the adviser said to me, go back and tell me this is an oral interview. because he and i had talked. so during the second class, he spoke in japanese than with him from midway to class because akamai been in japan for like a year. then he started in speaking in latin. i three years of latin in high school. last night that didn't include link and hide. that didn't even include the time i went to her home and cut her grass and got more latin. so he started talking in latin and so i responded to him. so i said the reiser said he would give me an oral interview. he said, we've read edifice. as it how do you spell at? [inaudible] [laughter] he went through all the stuff i'd already read because i was played. and once he told me how to pronounce it, then there's that literature. so he had a lecture over time, a speaking aid, where he would tell the story himself. i bless his soul, he died in note five. i was the last person to speak within. he had an aneurysm. he saved his life, i've got to
the other day. love to get your comment on this. >> great story. from a story done by john stanton, our friend from "buzzfeed." he points out a couple of facts here. republicans seem to be acting like it is 1912, not 2012. yesterday they appointed their 19 chairs of their committees, all of them men. all of them were men and not only that, by the way republicans also pushed a border security bill through yesterday so all of this talk about problems that republicans have with demographics, with hispanic community and women they seem to throw that all aside. >> bill: i would have to add 19 white men. they're the only people they could find as chairs for their committees. it says something about the difference between the two parties, doesn't it? >> absolutely. all you have to do is watch c-span and look at the floor of the house. you can see the lack of diversity on one side and the other half of the room that looks like the united states. i thank it was even sad within their leadership, they fought, you know, a wo
chair just to show a little diversity? >> they even said, john stanton from "buzzfeed" who was our guest earlier this week said michigan congresswoman candace miller was a prime contender for the house homeland security committee chair and she didn't get it. >> bill: they jumped over her to take a white guy who was on -- not even on that committee but on some other committee and bumped him up. i forget his name. >> on that note, just a few moments ago on a different tv show, stuart stevens romney adviser was on giving a post-mort emof what happened with the election. he said we didn't do a good enough job reaching out to hispanic voters and women voters. that was their problem. that's why -- he admitted that's why they lost the election. >> bill: all right. there you go. now -- have they learned anything? i would say the answer is no! by the way among african-americans, democrats 41 african-americans in the democratic caucus. with allen west getting booted out. there will be one republican african-american in
secretary edwin stanton thought that 33-year-old sheraton too too young when he proposed in july that he command the new arm any of the shenandoah. sheridan's size contributed to the impression of youth that he projected. he was 5'5" and only 115 pounds in 1864. but as grants memorable belie areply -- i think you'll find him big enough for the job. before ate -- appointment, the federal general and 14,000 troops marched down the shenandoah valley. crossing the river and threat in to washington. it was a tremendous shock. they were thrown to a panic. he rushed troops to the city from the outside of peter berg and early withdrew. to prevent a recurrence, the lincoln administration merged four military department in to a new one. the sheridan in charge of it. he was ordered to pursue the army to the death and destroy the shenandoah valley grain, produce, and livestock. grant told share dan don should be nothing left to invite the enemy to return. a first he did more than maneuver. he been cautioned to not go on the defensive. a defeat would harm president lincoln's re-election chances in no
. this is my favorite part. ready? the marlins' best player, stanton, voiced his frustration, he tweeted, "alright, i'm pissed off, plain and simple." >> he could be the first player in the history of baseball, 40 home runs and 40 rbis, he's going to have no one on base ahead of him. the winter ownerings meetings, major league baseball owners meetings, start today in chicago. and i would not be surprised if this was point one on the table among these owners. because this guy, the owner of the marlins, jeff loria, has raped this franchise repeatedly. and this time at the expense of, as you pointed out, the taxpayers of dade county in florida, building a brand-new stadium and then -- this is ridiculous. get the team out of there. >> this is the most unprincipled, ridiculous argument that's ever made. all of those things may be true. but the only reason you're saying this, number one, the only reason -- >> because i wanted josh johnson. >> because all those guys are on the jays and it's going to be that much harder for the red sox to make it to the playoffs. last year when the red sox dumpe
decides to go ahead and fire stanton and, you know, it is just -- it is a remarkable profile on courage, that he was sitting there fighting for the constitution, fighting for presidential prerogative and came within a vote of being removed from office. and prior to bill clinton the only president to be impeached. these aren't all stories about guy that is did the wise thing or looking back from the point of 200 years later was the thing that was the best for the presidency -- best for the country. it was at that moment he stood up, risked his political future to do what he believed was right for the country is and certainly right for the presidency. >> you have this note in here mary todd lincoln wrote to a friend. it combines the drinking of andrew johnson and also the card that we read from john wilkes booth. >> that's right. >> do you remember when that was made public, that note? >> i don't. i don't. >> it doesn't say. but i wondered if -- >> no. i think it was -- >> at the time? >> yes, i think so. if not, it certainly was the case that this thought was out there, that he had been
leader. television news did not make money. >> tell folks what the famous, was it frank stanton, it was bill bailey, came to you folks who are producers and journalists at cbs and said, remember? >> he used to call us the jewels in his crown speak he also said don't worry about making money. >> that's right. don't you guys worry about that. and what that meant was that when went out to do a story, we were totally absorbed in the story. we weren't worried about how much money it would take to cover the story. we just did it. even as late as 1980, i remember being able to charter a plane from rome to istanbul, because you thought you might be able to get an interview with somebody important. we didn't have to check with new york at all. >> but now, now we have become profit centers at the networks. you know, with the cable stations. being a prophet sent is a huge responsibility. because it means that you start thinking in a different way. you start thinking not so much about what the public ought to hear, but rather what the public wants to hear. you are now in competition with th
go. >> i am tom stanton. i teach at johns hopkins street, i would like to talk about administrative capacity, which is different from the discussion of authorities that congress might give fha to adjust premiums or what ever. i am curious, sarah, you and nick would see this and that made 1990's thought and the private mortgage industry killed that so fast all of our heads spun. i was told how much they disliked the idea. what are the politics this time around, because that strikes me as one of the few ways one could get to the improvements in people, processes, and assistance. >> well, my experience at that time is one that i think about a lot, what the opportunities are now. at the end of the day, there were two sets of ideas embodied in the proposal we had at the time. one was the ability to deal with the administrative flexibility and hiring a computer systems and the like. other was programmatic, giving us the ability to essentially doubled the products that we serve a long performance measures. i think the real objection to what came from folks in the industry was about the pro
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